IKEBANA - Flower Arranging

Ikebana ("living flowers") is the Japanese art of flower arrangement. It is also known as Kadō ("way of flowers"). The tradition dates back to the 7th century when floral offerings were made at altars. Later, they were placed in the the tokonomo (alcove) of a home. Ikebana reached its first zenith in the 16th century under the influence of Buddhist teamasters and has grown over the centuries, with over 1,000 different schools in Japan and abroad.


Ikebana ("living flowers") is the Japanese art of flower arrangement. It is also known as Kadō ("way of flowers"). The tradition dates back to the 7th century when floral offerings were made at altars. Later, they were placed in the the tokonomo (alcove) of a home. Ikebana reached its first zenith in the 16th century under the influence of Buddhist teamasters and has grown over the centuries, with over 1,000 different schools in Japan and abroad.

REMEMBERING IKKA NAKASHIMA

"I have been tremendously blessed in this life to study with many extraordinary teachers. One relationship that I cherish most deeply was my friendship with Sensei Ikka Nakashima. I studied Chado (tea ceremony) and Ikebana (flower arranging) with her in Chicago in the 1990s. Ikka had a profound influence on my life.
Ikka began training in calligraphy and tea ceremony at the age of 5 and attended school with members of the Japanese Imperial family. Later in life, she was honored as a National Treasure of Japan. In addition to her profound knowledge of the Japanese cultural arts she was also a respected microbiologist. In 2006, Professor Nakashima was invited to the Imperial Court in Tokyo to receive the Order of the Rising Sun, Gold and Silver Rays, from Emperor Hirohito for her tireless efforts to educate and spread traditional Japanese culture. I hold her in my heart."
Ganga